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Slow Metablosim?

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traineo Team
Posts: 4585
Member since
Jan 3, 2008
Posted: February 01, 2008
Now you are saying 2 oz of ham is 60 calories... before you said it was 100 calories.



Quoting: RMontgomery
The ham alone would be 100 calories. Even if it is 2oz.




1 oz of lean meat typically has around 7 g of protein, give or take. So yes, 2 oz of ham would have approximately 14 g of protein and around 60 calories.



YAY!!! We are learning something. I put about 1 oz of meat on my salad, which doesn't seem like a whole lot considering how much lettuce there is! But that's how it's got to be if I want it to be balanced C-P-F for my diet.



I honestly don't remember the brand of dressing, but I can look when I get home if you like. All I do when I shop is look at the nutritional information and make sure it can provide me the balance that I want to achieve in my meals. Just flip the bottles of dressing over until you find one that says 4 g fat per serving.



Counting calories is fine, but you really need to understand what types and volumes of macronutrients you are consuming as well.



I'm sorry if I get too defensive, but I do know what I'm talking about, and I do know how to prepare a 100 calorie HUGE salad!
traineo Guru
Posts: 2685
Member since
Feb 6, 2007
Posted: February 01, 2008
On the note of lo cal dressings, I like my diet-salads with about 1/2 tablespoon balsamic, 1/2 tblsp soy sauce and the juice from half a lemon.



traineo Guru
Posts: 2094
Member since
Sep 17, 2007
Posted: February 01, 2008
that sounds tasty! I tend to take a little low fat blue cheese and throw in some balsamic vinegar and that's pretty tasty...



I concede that the 100 calorie salad is a possibility!! (smooches all around)



(though I would seriously prefer the 300 cal one, and wouldn't need to eat extra to make up for the lack of calories )



And Dean, you created a monster!
traineo Guru
Posts: 2094
Member since
Sep 17, 2007
Posted: February 01, 2008
oh, I would be interested in what ham you're using as well! I don't generally eat deli meats, but in a pinch it would be good to have a go-to.
traineo Team
Posts: 4585
Member since
Jan 3, 2008
Posted: February 01, 2008
It's just sandwich meat sliced very thinly. Look on the nutrition label. Almost all (sandwich) hams and turkeys are very low fat.
traineo Team
Posts: 11352
Member since
Dec 13, 2007
Posted: February 01, 2008
Goodness, I didn't know that this topic would get so heated. So, Angie, please don't get angry, but do you subtract out the calories burned from eating fiber? I know people on Weight Watchers do that up to a point. You emphasized "net carbs" and I've heard people on Adkins talk about that, but I'm not exactly sure what you subtract out of total carbs to get net carbs.
traineo Team
Posts: 4585
Member since
Jan 3, 2008
Posted: February 01, 2008
Fiber isn't digestible, so it has no calorie content. Therefore, when counting carbohydrate intake, take the total minus fiber, and what's left is digestible carbs that will count toward your calorie content. If you do the math on nutrition labels, you will see that they do this when calculating calorie content.



If you eat stuff with "sugar alcohols" and the like, which is relatively new since the low carb craze like Atkins... those are supposedly not digestible either, but they still count toward the calorie content if I'm not mistaken (weird FDA rules). My point is that you might see something advertised as "2g Net Carbs", but the math doesn't add up because they're also subtracting sugar alcohol carbs from the total.



For the record, I don't advocate eating lots and lots of sugar alcohols, since to my knowledge they're not natural and many types are relatively new to market (no long term studies that might demonstrate adverse effects.)
traineo Guru
Posts: 2094
Member since
Sep 17, 2007
Posted: February 01, 2008
phew, good to see your response - I envisioned another battle coming up



I agree! The 'net carbs' nomiker came along with the low-carb diets. It's basically a marketing fad and is not supported or defined by the FDA. A quality product will just subtract the fiber from the carbs to show net carbs, while many others will subtract the sugar alcohols as well. The fiber grams can be ignored, but sugar alcohols are 2.6 calories per gram and have their own set of issues...



Couple of articles on the subject -



The Language Guy

The Mayo Clinic
traineo Guru
Posts: 834
Member since
Nov 12, 2007
Posted: February 02, 2008
It seems my simple question has stirred up a fight. Sorry about that.



Let's change the subject.



I think the amount of calories and the type of food (carbs, protein) should also depend on the type of exercise you do also. Counting only calorie may not yeild the best result. Right?



Say, if you want to lose weight mostly and not really into building muscle, you can have more calories from carbs instead of protein.
traineo Team
Posts: 4585
Member since
Jan 3, 2008
Posted: February 02, 2008
As you're losing weight and becoming more physically fit, you should always consider the internal consequences of the diet you're eating.



The more strength training you do, the more protein you need, true. But, if you eat too much protein in relation to carbs and fat, your body will begin to metabolize the protein for energy. You want your body to use the protein for muscle repair and muscle building, not energy! That's when you get into producing excessive ketones, which is filtered out in your kidneys and detectable in your urine. Ketones are hard on the kidneys among other things. That's why you hear some people telling you the Atkin's diet isn't healthy, since it's based on very little carbohydates and using primarily protein and fat for fuel.



There is a fine balance in how much protein you actually need to consume. For optimum results, you want to be on that threshold of having maximum protein with enough carbs and fats to prevent ketosis. That threshold varies per individual, but it's generally about 40% of you calories should come from carbs, 30% from protein, and 30% from fat. The total amount of protein you consume in a day should be in the range of .7 to 1 g per lb of lean muscle mass you have. .7g is sedentary, 1 g is for very active individuals.



There are lots of people, like professional body builders, that go outside of this realm with great physical results. How their body is performing internally, however, who knows? Obviously, the prescription above isn't applicable to everyone in every situation, but is a good rule of thumb to go by.



If you ever wonder if you're eating too much protein in relation to carbs you can always go to your doctor and have your urine checked for excessive ketone bodies.



The other end of the spectrum is eating too many carbs in relation to protein. If you don't have adequate protein intake, you can bet, especially if you're working out, that not only are NOT going to gain muscle, but you're going to lose it! Any type of exercise will require muscle repair, and if you don't have the protein building blocks to do it, then it's not going to happen. This is one reason why so many people who diet without regard to their protein intake lose so much muscle weight!



Also, excessive carbohydrate intake, especially with high GI foods, will increase your insulin and drive your body to store fat as I've described before.



So, you see, it really is a fine balance! Everyone's ratios are slightly tweaked - you have to do your own experimenting to see what ratio works best for you. 40-30-30 is a good place to start, though.
traineo Guru
Posts: 650
Member since
Apr 16, 2007
Posted: February 02, 2008
Angie,



Thanks - that is a good read. I have to say that for the last post, I didn't read the entire thread. You look like you really have done your homework! It is great to have people share their knowledge.
traineo Team
Posts: 4585
Member since
Jan 3, 2008
Posted: February 03, 2008
Thanks Tim! I spent countless hours researching and trying to understand nutrition in college before I committed to any diet plan. I wanted to know how to get maximum results without damaging my body or losing muscle mass.



I really wish the school systems would place more emphasis on a proper nutritional education. Seriously, how much of what you know about PROPER nutrition did you learn in school? I bet very little, if any. I truly believe if we would teach our children the basics, (other than the four food groups) we would all be better off because we would know what we needed to do if we became a bit overweight. As it is now, most people are clueless. Seriously, I bet 80% of the population has no idea what foods have primarily carbs, fat, and protein. We only seem to learn that kind of stuff when we need to do something about our weight!
traineo Guru
Posts: 650
Member since
Apr 16, 2007
Posted: February 04, 2008
You are correct, the same can be said for basic financial concepts. The two things that seem to be the biggest issues in the US, and they don't teach them in school - but they do teach politics......... hmmmmm.
traineo Newbie
Posts: 4
Member since
Sep 15, 2007
Posted: February 04, 2008
Wow, a lot happens when you don't check this stuff regularly!



@Angie, regarding my training. My levels of exercise haven't changed since going to the trainer. Their philosophy seems to be step 1, get the body down to a lean size/break it down. Step 2, put on the muscle/build it up. I did indicate to them that I'm not concerned with getting huge and they may have a different approach for those people.



My exercise regime is basically play basketball once per week, hit the weights every couple of weeks or so (yeah yeah, not good) and if the scheduling works, do a little sparring with a buddy (boxing) every couple of weeks.



The body builders I've met tend to be more concerned with weights than cardio. Muscle will burn more calories than fat, so it's definitely a benefit to work out. And obviously cardio burns calories. However, as anyone who hits the treadmill for an hour per day and doesn't lose weight can attest, it's not all its cracked up to be. I'd say that 80% of weight loss is eating habits, and that means eating more, good food.



I'm still trying to get into a better habit of weights and cardio though as eating right may be 80% or weight loss, it doesn't cover a lot of the general health perks of exercise and those shouldn't be downplayed!



cheers,

Doug
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